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Do The Robot

By Melissa Sariffodeen 15 minutes
Level For Everyone
Subjects Social Sciences, Physical Education
components
  • Programming
Tools & Languages Unplugged
Key Coding Concepts
  • Algorithms
  • Sequences
Terminology

Algorithms

A step-by-step set of operations to be performed to help solve a problem

Sequences

Identifying a series of steps for a task. Computers and Scratch read and perform commands in order from top to bottom

A basic "unplugged" challenge to get students thinking about simple instructions and sequences, or in coding terms, creating algorithms.

Sample activities for the pairs to complete i.e. tying a shoe, opening a door, doing the macarena

  • In groups of two, assign one learner to be the programmer and one to be the robot. Assign each pair an activity like tying a shoe or opening a door.
  • These activities could be pulled from a hat, assigned, or chosen by the students
  • Ask the programmer to explain to their partner (the robot) how to perform the steps needed to complete their activity using words only!
  • Switch pairs
  • After the activity, use this as an opportunity to talk about the importance of simple, clear instructions and sequences.
  • Congratulate learners for creating their first algorithms!
  • Have students perform their coding sequence in front of the class.
  • Which was harder being the programmer or the robot?
  • Have the class guess what the pair may have missed as they were explaining the steps.
  • Choose some code to review as a group - do students recognize any patterns?
  • Any ways they could simplify their algorithms?

Learning Outcomes

We used simple, clear instructions to perform a task.
We created an algorithm (a step-by-step set of operations to be performed to help solve a problem).
We learned the importance of sequence in coding - Computers read and perform commands in order from top to bottom (order matters!).

Teach lessons that are tied to your existing curriculum! https://bit.ly/CLClessons

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The K-12 Computer Science Framework

Although learning how to build digital projects is a key part of Computer Science education, students should also learn a wider set of skills and competencies that will help them to harness the power of digital technologies as both creators and consumers. A comprehensive approach to K-12 Computer Science education includes learning about the following five focus areas:

View Framework ➝

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By the end of high school, students should be able to create a simple computer program.

Computing and Networks

By the end of high school, students should understand and be able to use the tools and devices commonly used to build digital projects.

Data

By the end of high school, students should be able to explain how we use computers to create, store, organize, and analyze data.

Technology and Society

By the end of high school, students should be able to explore the ways in which technology and society have mutually shaped each other.

Design

By the end of high school, students should be able to apply design principles to the digital projects they create.